Università degli Studi di Urbino Carlo Bo / Portale Web di Ateneo


ANCIENT GREEK LITERATURE
LETTERATURA GRECA

Aspects of the
Aspetti del

A.Y. Credits
2017/2018 12
Lecturer Email Office hours for students
Liana Lomiento Immediately after class
Teaching in foreign languages
Course with optional materials in a foreign language English
This course is entirely taught in Italian. Study materials can be provided in the foreign language and the final exam can be taken in the foreign language.

Assigned to the Degree Course

Classical and Modern Languages and Literatures (LM-14 / LM-15)
Curriculum: PERCORSO COMUNE
Date Time Classroom / Location
Date Time Classroom / Location

Learning Objectives

The course intends to reflect on some aspects of the concept of "sacred" in Greek thought in classical theatre and in Socratic-Platonic reflection.

The aim is to highlight some relevant methodological questions that are significant to the philological, historical and literary inquiry, and to the history of thought and mentality, through the concrete study of texts in which the notion of "sacred", or of texts in which aspects of the "sacred" (such as being pious, sanctity, sacrifice and sacrificial celebration, respect for divinity, etc.) are explored, which was a central concept in Greek religion and anthropology.

Program

The first part of the course will focus on the reading and commentary of Eschylean Tragedy Supplices (first half of the 5th century BC)

It will open with a general introduction to the theme of the sacredness of the supplications on which this tragedy of Aeschylus is focussed, and to the value of supplication in Greek culture.

Below, and within the first semester, we will dwell on the reading, translation and critical commentary of Aischylus’ Supplices.

The metrical forms of the recited sections will be studied; as far as the choral parts are concerned, the general interpretation of the lyrical forms will be presented, together with the strophic structure of the songs.

In the second part, which will begin in the second semester, we will read Plato's dialogue Euthyphro (beginning of the IVth century BC).

It focuses on the theme of "holiness", which in the course of dialogue seeks a general definition, and as such is consistent with the general topic of our course. Dialogue provides an insight into the ethical-religious mentality of Plato's time. In particular, it seems to criticise a religious mentality founded on the external respect of the cults, on opportunistic and merely ritualistic manners, obsessed with the fear of the miasma (contamination).

The text will be read in the original language and appropriately commented, both in relation to Platonic thought and in relation to the history of mentality.

Bridging Courses

It is absolutely necessary to have a solid knowledge of the Greek language.

Learning Achievements (Dublin Descriptors)

From the point of view of the specific information obtained, at the end of the course the student will acquire an in-depth knowledge of an ethical-religious notion of central value in the history of ancient Greek mentality.

More generally, and well in line with the professional curriculum profile, the process of analytical reading of the chosen texts will have a significant impact on the student's ability to deal with a competent and rigorous reading of the proposed texts (literary, dramatic, philosophical, and other tipologies which may be presented during the lessons), developing analytical skills, close reading, synthesis and critical thinking about data and sources. The set of skills acquired will allow the student to formulate philologically (scientifically) correct hypotheses, based on new texts or new sets of texts (data, sources, literary texts).

From the point of view of general education, the student will deepen his awareness of specific methodological aspects characterizing the philological and historical-literary inquiry, as well as his aesthetic sensibility to the formal and rhetorical aspects of literary poetry and prose.

Teaching Material

The teaching material prepared by the lecturer in addition to recommended textbooks (such as for instance slides, lecture notes, exercises, bibliography) and communications from the lecturer specific to the course can be found inside the Moodle platform › blended.uniurb.it

Supporting Activities

The course can be supplemented by relevant seminars and conferences or, in any case, of educational and methodological relevance with regard to the methods and the themes of ancient Greek Literature and in general Greek and Latin classics.


Didactics, Attendance, Course Books and Assessment

Didactics

Front Lessons

Attendance

It is strongly recommended that the student attend the lectures and the optional seminars.

The student is required to read all the texts in the program, which must be translated and commented according to the lines indicated in the course.

The student is also required to read the study texts as planned and to those indicated by the teacher in the lessons.

The student is also required to show knowledge of Greek literature with special attention to the parts (authors, works, historical-literary periods) that have been the subject of the course.

Course books

Reference issues for the Greek texts of the course will be: Aeschyli Tragoediae, M.L. West (ed.), Stuttgart 1998 (II ed.); Platonis Opera I, J. Burnet (ed.), Oxford 1987 (1900)

The student is required to read sections on the Attic theatre and philosophical literature (with particular attention to platonic production) in one of the following manuals: A. Porro - W. Lapini (Bologna, Il Mulino, 2017), F. Montanari (Rome -Bari, Laterza, 1998), GA Privitera - R. Pretagostini (Turin, Einaudi, 1997), L.E. Rossi (Florence, Le Monnier, 1995)

On Aescylus’ Supplices, read A. Garvie's essay, Aeschylus' Supplices. Play and Trilogy, Bristol 2006 (II ed.); also consult the commented edition of A.J. Bowen, Aeschylus. Suppliant Women, Oxford 2013

On Plato read the essay by F. Trabattoni, Plato, Rome 2013 (2009)

The student is also required to read the essay: Sacred Words: Orality, Literacy and Religion, ed. By A.P.M.H. Lardinois, J.H. Blok, M.G.M. Van der Poel, Leiden-Boston 2011

For the Greek metric, it is advisable to consult the manual of B. Gentili, L. Lomiento, Metrica and Rhythmic. History of Poetic Forms of Ancient Greece, Milan 2012 (2003)

It will also read, in an English translation (in one of the editions with bilingual text currently circulating), the following works:

Euripides, Iphigenia in Tauris

Euripides, Bacchae

Plato, Socrates Apology

Further bibliography will be indicated by the teacher during lessons.

The texts that will not be available at the University Library will be made available by the teacher.

Assessment

Written and oral exam:

- a two-hour written exam provides for the translation and comment of a short text drawn from all the texts commented on in the lesson; a written test will be set for each exam session; it will be evaluated and will go on average with the oral test within the same session;

- The oral exam provides general questions on the subject of the course and a translation test on a portion of text - from the texts planned in the program – which is not included in the lesson comments.

Additional Information for Non-Attending Students

Didactics

There are no teaching methods in e-learning.

Attendance

The student is required to read all the texts in the program, which must be translated and commented according to the lines indicated in the course.

The student is also required to read carefully the study texts planned.

The student is also required to show knowledge of Greek literature with special attention to the parts (authors, works, historical-literary periods) that have been the subject of the course.

Course books

Reference editions for the Greek texts of the course will be:

Aeschyli Tragoediae, M.L. West (ed.), Stuttgart 1998 (II ed.)

Platonis Opera I, J. Burnet (ed.), Oxford 1987 (1900)

The student is required to read sections on the Attic theatre and philosophical literature (with particular attention to platonic production) in one of the following manuals: A. Porro - W. Lapini (Bologna, Il Mulino, 2017), F. Montanari (Rome -Bari, Laterza, 1998), GA Privitera - R. Pretagostini (Turin, Einaudi, 1997), L.E. Rossi (Florence, Le Monnier, 1995)

On Aescylus’ Supplices, read A. Garvie's essay, Aeschylus' Supplices. Play and Trilogy, Bristol 2006 (II ed.); also consult the commented edition of A.J. Bowen, Aeschylus. Suppliant Women, Oxford 2013

On Plato read the essay by F. Trabattoni, Plato, Rome 2013 (2009)

The student is also required to read the essay: Sacred Words: Orality, Literacy and Religion, ed. By A.P.M.H. Lardinois, J.H. Blok, M.G.M. Van der Poel, Leiden-Boston 2011

For the Greek metric, it is advisable to consult the manual of B. Gentili, L. Lomiento, Metrica and Rhythmic. History of Poetic Forms of Ancient Greece, Milan 2012 (2003)

It will also read, in an English translation (in one of the editions with bilingual text currently circulating), the following works:

Euripides, Iphigenia in Tauris

Euripides, Bacchae

Plato, Socrates Apology

It is also required to read the manual of R. Pierini, R. Tosi, Capire il greco, Bologna 2014.

The texts that will not be available at the University Library will be made available by the teacher.

Assessment

Written and oral exam:

- a two-hour written exam provides for the translation and comment of a short text drawn from all the texts commented on in the lesson; a written test will be set for each exam session; it will be evaluated and will go on average with the oral test within the same session;

- The oral exam provides general questions on the subject of the course and a translation test on a portion of text - from the texts planned in the program – which is not included in the lesson comments.

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