Università degli Studi di Urbino Carlo Bo / Portale Web di Ateneo


HISTORY OF THE GREEK THEATRE
STORIA DEL TEATRO GRECO

A.Y. Credits
2021/2022 6
Lecturer Email Office hours for students
Liana Lomiento Immediately after class
Teaching in foreign languages
Course with optional materials in a foreign language English French
This course is entirely taught in Italian. Study materials can be provided in the foreign language and the final exam can be taken in the foreign language.

Assigned to the Degree Course

Humanities, Cultural Heritage Studies and Philosophy (L-10)
Curriculum: ARCHEOLOGICO E FILOLOGICO-LETTERARIO CLASSICO
Date Time Classroom / Location
Date Time Classroom / Location

Learning Objectives

The student will acquire the basic information on the material and structural aspects of ancient theatre (actor, chorus, material organization of the representation, agonistic occasion, scenic space, public) and the story of the transmission of the dramatic texts from the "first" performance to us.


Through the reading from the original language of Euripide's Heracles, the student will learn to understand a classical dramatic text in its linguistic, metrical-musical, thematic, historical-literary aspects, and its theatrical dynamics.

Program

The course will begin (I-III week) from a general introduction to the Attic theatre, to its historical-evolutionary (from the initial stages to the time of maturity), and historical-cultural (society, historical events) aspects as well as to its material and dramaturgical features (shape and structure of the theatrical building, mask, actors, scenic space, theatrical machines, roles and movements on the scene).

It will continue (IV week) illustrating the figure and work of Euripides, whose tragedy will be the specific object of reading and analysis.

The remaining part of the course (V-IX week) will be entirely devoted to the original language reading of the Heracles, whose text will be translated and commented in a critical-textual, historical-literary perspective, as well as in terms of plot and dramaturgy. The iambic trimeter will be introduced and illustrated, with reading exercises, and some notes will be given about the structure of the lyrical sections.

Learning Achievements (Dublin Descriptors)

The student will be guided to an essential knowledge of Classical Greek theatre, and to the ability to independently read a classical theatrical text with the complexity it presents.

From the point of view of the information obtained, the student will acquire an in-depth knowledge of issues relating to the transmission of the text (through a careful reading of the critical apparatus and of the transmitted lectiones), its performance and representation on the stage, the treatment of the plot in relation to the mythographical tradition.

More generally, the process of analytical reading of the chosen text will have important consequences on the student's ability to deal proficiently with an independent, rigorous reading of every kind of source (literary, historiographical, etc.), and to develop analytical skills of close reading, synthesis and critical thinking on the data and sources.

From the educational point of view, the student will deepen their awareness of specific methodological aspects characterizing literary research and, in particular, his/her dramatic and aesthetic sensitivity to the formal aspects of the poetic and rhetorical and, namely, theatrical discourse.

Teaching Material

The teaching material prepared by the lecturer in addition to recommended textbooks (such as for instance slides, lecture notes, exercises, bibliography) and communications from the lecturer specific to the course can be found inside the Moodle platform › blended.uniurb.it

Supporting Activities

The course maight be complemented by labs and conferences methodologically relevant to the training and to matters relating to methods and themes concerning ancient Greek Theatre.

As part of the course, prof. O. Mei (L-Ant / 07 Classical Archeology) will hold 4 hours lectures on the material history of the theater building from the archaic age to the Roman age.


Didactics, Attendance, Course Books and Assessment

Didactics

Frontal and blended lessons.

Attendance

A good command of the ancient Greek language is required.

Attending students should regularly take part in the lectures and any supplementary seminars.

Course books

I. the reference edition:

Euripidis Fabulae, edidit James Diggle, Oxford Classical Texts, Oxonii 1981, pp. 115-175

II. the reference handbook:

 G. Mastromarco, P. Totaro, Storia del Teatro greco, Firenze 2008

III. Supplementary readings (mandatory)

a. The student is required to read two out of the following essays:

-- Helene P. Foley, ‘The Heracles’, in Ritual Irony: Poetry and Sacrifice in Euripides, Cornell University Press, Cornell 1985, pp. 147-205

-- Mark W. Padilla, Heroic Paternity in Euripides' Heracles, Arethusa, 27, 1994, 27/3, pp. 279-302

-- S. E. Lawrence, The God That Is Truly God and the Universe of Euripides' Heracles, Mnemosyne , 51, 1998, pp. 129-146

-- Rush Rehm, The Play of Space: Before, Behind, and Beyond in Euripides' Heracles, Illinois Classical Studies, 24/25, 1999-2000, pp. 363-375

-- Brooke Holmes, Euripides' Heracles in the Flesh, Classical Antiquity, 27, 2008, pp. 231-281

b. The student is required to read the following works in Italian translation:

Sofocle, Aiace

Euripide, Oreste

Aristofane, Pace

Assessment

Oral exam.

The aim of the test is to check knowledge of the history of Greek theatre (authors, works, chronological aspects), Greek theatre in its historical context (social framework, socio-political context, ritual context), historical-literary aspects (treatment of myth, comparison with other coeve plays), its functioning (theater building, actors, stage roles, stage machines, music, dramaturgy).
It also intends to ascertain the linguistic competence of the students, and their acquired ability to translate and interpret a dramatic text in the original language. Particular attention will be paid to this aspect of the text.

Evaluations will be sized as follows:

assessments of excellence: an excellent knowledge of the ancient Greek language; the student's possession of good critical and in-depth skills; knowing how to relate safely the main issues addressed in the course; the use of a language appropriate to the specificity of the discipline.

discrete assessments: a fair knowledge of the ancient Greek language; the student's possession of a mnemonic knowledge of the contents; a modest critical capacity and connection between the topics discussed: the use of an appropriate language.

sufficient assessment: a sufficient knowledge of the ancient Greek language; the achievement of a minimal knowledge base on the topics dealt with by the student, even in the presence of some training gaps; the use of inappropriate language.

negative evaluations: an insufficient knowledge of the ancient Greek language; difficulty of orientation of the student with respect to the topics dealt with in the exam texts; training gaps; the use of inappropriate language.

Additional Information for Non-Attending Students

Didactics

Blended lessons.

Attendance

The student is requires to carefully observe the program indicated in the vademecum.


In case of specific needs, which require a variation of the indicated program, the student should contact the teacher to arrange an alternative program.

The student is expected to have a sure knowledge of the Greek language.

Course books

I. the reference edition:

Euripidis Fabulae, edidit James Diggle, Oxford Classical Texts, Oxonii 1981, pp. 115-175

II. the reference handbook:

 G. Mastromarco, P. Totaro, Storia del Teatro greco, Firenze 2008

III. Supplementary readings (mandatory)

a. The student is required to read one of the following essays:

-- Helene P. Foley, ‘The Heracles’, in Ritual Irony: Poetry and Sacrifice in Euripides, Cornell University Press, Cornell 1985, pp. 147-205

-- Mark W. Padilla, Heroic Paternity in Euripides' Heracles, Arethusa, 27, 1994, 27/3, pp. 279-302

-- S. E. Lawrence, The God That Is Truly God and the Universe of Euripides' Heracles, Mnemosyne , 51, 1998, pp. 129-146

-- Rush Rehm, The Play of Space: Before, Behind, and Beyond in Euripides' Heracles, Illinois Classical Studies, 24/25, 1999-2000, pp. 363-375

-- Brooke Holmes, Euripides' Heracles in the Flesh, Classical Antiquity, 27, 2008, pp. 231-281

b. The student is required to read the following works in Italian translation:

Sofocle, Aiace

Euripide, Oreste

Aristofane, Pace

Assessment

Oral exam.

The aim of the test is to check knowledge of the history of Greek theatre (authors, works, chronological aspects), Greek theatre in its historical context (social framework, socio-political context, ritual context), historical-literary aspects (treatment of myth, comparison with other coeve plays), its functioning (theater building, actors, stage roles, stage machines, music, dramaturgy).
It also intends to ascertain the linguistic competence of the students, and their acquired ability to translate and interpret a dramatic text in the original language. Particular attention will be paid to this aspect of the text.

Evaluations will be sized as follows:

assessments of excellence: an excellent knowledge of the ancient Greek language; the student's possession of good critical and in-depth skills; knowing how to relate safely the main issues addressed in the course; the use of a language appropriate to the specificity of the discipline.

discrete assessments: a fair knowledge of the ancient Greek language; the student's possession of a mnemonic knowledge of the contents; a modest critical capacity and connection between the topics discussed: the use of an appropriate language.

sufficient assessment: a sufficient knowledge of the ancient Greek language; the achievement of a minimal knowledge base on the topics dealt with by the student, even in the presence of some training gaps; the use of inappropriate language.

negative evaluations: an insufficient knowledge of the ancient Greek language; difficulty of orientation of the student with respect to the topics dealt with in the exam texts; training gaps; the use of inappropriate language.

Notes

Further useful bibliography might be indicated by the teacher during the lessons.

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