Università degli Studi di Urbino Carlo Bo / Portale Web di Ateneo


ROMAN HISTORY
STORIA ROMANA

A.Y. Credits
2020/2021 6
Lecturer Email Office hours for students
Viola Gheller Due to the current situation, students are requested to arrange an online meeting via email
Teaching in foreign languages
Course with optional materials in a foreign language
This course is entirely taught in Italian. Study materials can be provided in the foreign language and the final exam can be taken in the foreign language.

Assigned to the Degree Course

Pedagogy (LM-85)
Curriculum: SCIENZE UMANE
Date Time Classroom / Location
Date Time Classroom / Location

Learning Objectives

The course aims at providing students with a general knowledge of historical events from Roman Archaic era to Late Antiquity, with particular attention to political, economic and social phenomena. I will present the main research methodologies and introduce students to the use of different sources (literary, epigraphic, numismatic, juridical, archaeological). The course's main target, therefore, is not a rote learning of facts, but rather the acquisition of critical and interpretive competences, potentially useful in all disciplines: history will be presented not as a static and well-established knowledge, but as the result of an always evolving reflection.

Program

In the first lessons I will present the main difficulties affecting the reconstruction of events and phenomena of Roman history. I will then introduce the different kinds of sources and the ways in which each of them may clarify single aspects of Roman history.

I will then present the main facts and phenomena of Roman history, following a chronological order. Roman history will be divided in six main periods: from the foundation to the end of the monarchy; from the early republic until the conquest of the Mediterranea; the late republic; augustan principate; from the Julio-Claudians to the Antonines; the severan dinasity and the III century crisis.

Particular attention will be devoted to the Late Antique period, from the tetrarchy to the barbarian kingdoms, and to the problem of the "fall of the Roman empire". During the last classes, students will be asked to actively present and discuss the monographs listed in the Course books section, subsection 2.

Bridging Courses

None. 

Learning Achievements (Dublin Descriptors)

Knowledge and understanding: Students should gain konwledge of the main events of Roman history, and be able to place them chronologically and geographically. They should be able to understand single facts in broad historical processes and be aware of the links and connections among them.

Applying knowledge and understanding: Students will acquire the ability to read documents critically, and to place them chronologically, indentifying the original context and taking information and significat data out of them. They should be able to establish links, formulate hypotheses, organise effective arguments, in order to approach problems and questions relevant to ancient history, but potentially useful in every discipline.

Making judgements: Students should acquire the ability to approach historical sources and take relevant information out of them; they should be able to distinguish scholarly interpretation from the data they can deduce from the documents, and to make their own judgements about the conclusions presented in secondary literature.

Communication skills: Students should learn how to use the discipline's vocabulary and to describe an event or historical process clearly and effectively, avoiding value judgements, anachronisms and over-interpretation.

Learning skills: Students should know primary sources, main bibliographical instruments, corpora and databases, in order to take on autonomously the study of Roman history.

Teaching Material

The teaching material prepared by the lecturer in addition to recommended textbooks (such as for instance slides, lecture notes, exercises, bibliography) and communications from the lecturer specific to the course can be found inside the Moodle platform › blended.uniurb.it

Teaching, Attendance, Course Books and Assessment

Teaching

Didactics will include lectures and seminars, in which students wil be requested to actively analyse and interpret the sources.

Attendance

Attendance is not mandatory, but strongly recommended

Course books

1) Handbook:

G. Geraci, A. Marcone, Storia romana, editio maior, Firenze, Le Monnier 2017

or

G. Cresci Marrone, F. Rohr Vio, L. Calvelli, Roma antica. Storia e documenti, Bologna, Il Mulino, 2014

2) Text books:

S. Mazzarino, La fine del mondo antico. Le cause della caduta dell’impero romano, Torino, Bollate Boringhieri 2008

or

P. Brown, Il mondo tardo antico: da Marco Aurelio a Maometto, Torino, Einaudi 2017 [The World of Late Antiquity: AD 150–750, London, Thames and Hudson, 1971]

or

B. Ward-Perkins, La caduta di Roma e la fine della civiltà, Roma-Bari, Laterza 2008 [The Fall of Rome and the End of Civilisation, Oxford, OUP 2006]

Students are expected to know documents presented during the course and uploaded on the Moodle platform.

Assessment

Oral exam, generally consisting of three questions, about the archaic era and the republic; high empire; late antiquity.

Attending students will have the chance to present in the last lessons one of the Textbooks (see Course Books, point 2) and discuss it with their colleagues. The presentation will be evaluated and considered as part of the final exam. In this case the knowledge of the chosen text book will not be verified during the final exam. The knowledge of the text will be verified during the final exam for non-attending students and those not opting for the presentation.

Evaluation criteria:

Excellent (30-27): knowledge of events and historical processes, ability to place them in their chronological and geographical context; good capacity to deal with sources and create links; good use of the discipline's vocabulary.

Good to average (26-23): rote learning of discussed topics, not corresponding to critical ability and to the ability to link different topics; imperfect use of the discipline's vocabulary.

Sufficient (22-18): approximate knowledge of the discussed topics, with difficulties in placing the events chronologically and geographically; inaccurate vocabulary.

Insufficient: bad and incomplete knowledge of the discussed topics; wrong vocabulary.

Disability and Specific Learning Disorders (SLD)

Students who have registered their disability certification or SLD certification with the Inclusion and Right to Study Office can request to use conceptual maps (for keywords) during exams.

To this end, it is necessary to send the maps, two weeks before the exam date, to the course instructor, who will verify their compliance with the university guidelines and may request modifications.

Additional Information for Non-Attending Students

Course books

1) Handbook:

G. Geraci, A. Marcone, Storia romana, editio maior, Firenze, Le Monnier 2017

or

G. Cresci Marrone, F. Rohr Vio, L. Calvelli, Roma antica. Storia e documenti, Bologna, Il Mulino, 2014

2) Text books:

S. Mazzarino, La fine del mondo antico. Le cause della caduta dell’impero romano, Torino, Bollate Boringhieri 2008

or

P. Brown, Il mondo tardo antico: da Marco Aurelio a Maometto, Torino, Einaudi 2017 [The World of Late Antiquity: AD 150–750, London, Thames and Hudson, 1971]

or

B. Ward-Perkins, La caduta di Roma e la fine della civiltà, Roma-Bari, Laterza 2008 [The Fall of Rome and the End of Civilisation, Oxford, OUP 2006]

3) Supplementary readings:

G. Poma, Le istituzioni politiche del mondo romano, Bologna, Il Mulino 2002

or

G. Alfoldy, Storia sociale dell’antica Roma, Bologna, Il Mulino, 2012

Assessment

Same as for attending students.

Disability and Specific Learning Disorders (SLD)

Students who have registered their disability certification or SLD certification with the Inclusion and Right to Study Office can request to use conceptual maps (for keywords) during exams.

To this end, it is necessary to send the maps, two weeks before the exam date, to the course instructor, who will verify their compliance with the university guidelines and may request modifications.

Notes

Students who previously attended a Roman History course can arrange a different program with the lecturer.

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